Mike Mitchell

MMmmmm
  • September 3, 2012 8:50 pm
    We also snapped this picture of Mare Crisium, which doesn’t look very big, but it’s 345 miles across, roughly equal to the distance from LA to San Francisco. View high resolution

    We also snapped this picture of Mare Crisiumwhich doesn’t look very big, but it’s 345 miles across, roughly equal to the distance from LA to San Francisco.

  • September 3, 2012 8:46 pm
    I brought my telescope to a friends last night and a bunch of us checked out Saturn for the short time it was in the sky. It wasn’t ideal conditions, but I managed to get this picture of Saturn. Once it starts appearing again later in the year I should be able to snap a better picture. View high resolution

    I brought my telescope to a friends last night and a bunch of us checked out Saturn for the short time it was in the sky. It wasn’t ideal conditions, but I managed to get this picture of Saturn. Once it starts appearing again later in the year I should be able to snap a better picture.

  • August 28, 2012 3:09 am
    So excited, my first decent picture of Jupiter!
I think the mirrors are slightly misaligned because the focus is off just a tad but I won’t complain. Expect something better in the future. 
You can barely make out a few of  the moons, but they are there. It’s much easier to see them through the scope.  View high resolution

    So excited, my first decent picture of Jupiter!

    I think the mirrors are slightly misaligned because the focus is off just a tad but I won’t complain. Expect something better in the future. 

    You can barely make out a few of  the moons, but they are there. It’s much easier to see them through the scope. 

  • August 27, 2012 8:33 pm
    So this week I drove 5 hours north to the outskirts of Yosemite to buy an 18” Dobsonian telescope. 
Decided to try and see if my current Astrophotography equipment would work on it, and holy shit. Will hopefully have some Jupiter pics so share by tomorrow. Saturn is unfortunately blocked for me at the moment.   View high resolution

    So this week I drove 5 hours north to the outskirts of Yosemite to buy an 18” Dobsonian telescope. 

    Decided to try and see if my current Astrophotography equipment would work on it, and holy shit. Will hopefully have some Jupiter pics so share by tomorrow. Saturn is unfortunately blocked for me at the moment.  

  • August 7, 2012 11:35 am
    Sorry for the absence, I was on a vacation in the middle of nowhere enjoying the nowhere-ness. 
I did manage to snap a picture of the moon while I was there though! From the night of July 31st.  View high resolution

    Sorry for the absence, I was on a vacation in the middle of nowhere enjoying the nowhere-ness. 

    I did manage to snap a picture of the moon while I was there though! From the night of July 31st. 

  • June 6, 2012 11:22 am
    This was my favorite picture that I took of the transit. The cloud almost makes it look like another planet. 
It’s kind of a bummer that this won’t happen again in our lives, but I guess that is what makes it special. I’m just glad I got to check it out.  View high resolution

    This was my favorite picture that I took of the transit. The cloud almost makes it look like another planet. 

    It’s kind of a bummer that this won’t happen again in our lives, but I guess that is what makes it special. I’m just glad I got to check it out. 

  • June 5, 2012 4:03 pm
    Heres my first shot of the transit. 
It’s pretty insane when you realize how small Venus looks compared to the sun, and it’s still about 65 million miles closer to us! In reality, Earth and Venus are smaller than those two sunspots.  View high resolution

    Heres my first shot of the transit. 

    It’s pretty insane when you realize how small Venus looks compared to the sun, and it’s still about 65 million miles closer to us! In reality, Earth and Venus are smaller than those two sunspots. 

  • June 4, 2012 2:43 pm
    Got myself a solar filter today, preparing for some hardcore Transit of Venus action tomorrow!  View high resolution

    Got myself a solar filter today, preparing for some hardcore Transit of Venus action tomorrow! 

  • April 17, 2012 3:42 pm
    "Pokemon"
The entire collection from “Just Like Us” is online at Gallery1988.com, where you can purchase the remaining prints & originals.

    "Pokemon"

    The entire collection from “Just Like Us” is online at Gallery1988.com, where you can purchase the remaining prints & originals.

  • April 9, 2012 10:52 am
    Thanks to everyone who came out to the show on Friday! It was awesome, and I met some really great people. 
The entire show is online at Gallery1988.com, where you can purchase prints & originals. 
If you are interested in buying the print above, you can do so here.

    Thanks to everyone who came out to the show on Friday! It was awesome, and I met some really great people. 

    The entire show is online at Gallery1988.com, where you can purchase prints & originals. 

    If you are interested in buying the print above, you can do so here.

  • March 14, 2012 5:53 pm
    I’ve been getting a lot of questions lately about my space photography, so I thought I would explain in as much detail how I take them, as well as other information for getting into amateur astronomy. 
Before I get started though I want to just say to anyone out there who isn’t even remotely interested in space, give it a chance. For some reason the majority of my life I looked at space as something artificial, boring and in a way two dimensional. Then one night I was looking at the moon and realized that it was a tangible object, and there was nothing separating me, from it. From that moment on it had my attention, and now I realize that it is by far the most fascinating and mysterious thing that is available to me. I think we owe it to ourselves and to future generations to get excited about it, and to start a new dialogue pushing for more funding/research/exploration. If you want to learn more, I recommend following r/space and r/spaceporn on reddit, two of my favorite subreddits by far.
Now for the goodies. 

NightWatch: A Practical Guide to Viewing the Universe
This book is a must. A lot of the info I’m about to share is ripped right from this book. I wish I would have picked it up before buying my current telescope because it has an entire section devoted to what to buy. It also has tons of info for learning the night sky, which I am still in the process of doing. It’s a strange thing when the night sky begins to look familiar and you can pick out planets and constellations instantly.

Celestron SkyMaster Giant 15x70 Binoculars
It’s recommended that you start with binoculars, but I don’t think it’s a huge deal. However, if you are on a limited budget and want to see things like Jupiter and its moons, craters on the moon, (a faint) Andromeda Galaxy, then pick these up. They are a good way to learn the night sky and will help you in your transition to a telescope. I have this particular pair and I still use them to help spot harder to find objects. They will also increase the amount of stars you see by quite a lot. 

Celestron 21063 AstroMaster 90 AZ Refractor Telescope
This is my telescope. It is also my first telescope. I love it, but it has some major drawbacks. For objects higher in the sky, the telescope tends to slide, taking the objects out of view, making for some real frustration. It’s huge, but it looks pretty awesome. All in all I’ve seen some really great stuff with this telescope, but I’m not sure I would recommend it.

Orion SkyQuest XT8 Classic Dobsonian Telescope
The book I posted above recommends a moderately priced Dobsonian telescope for beginners, and I wish I would have held out for something like this. I don’t have any experience with one, but I have a hard time recommending my own telescope to people because of the frustration it has caused me, so I figured I would share this as well.

Celestron Omni 2X Barlow Lens
A lot of purists will tell you to avoid Barlow lenses, or at least not to become dependent on them. I really like mine. It makes finding objects in the sky much more difficult but will allow for greater detail of smaller objects. 
Here is what I use for taking pictures:

Opteka T-Mount Adapter
This is required to attach the T-Adapter to my camera. I use a Canon Rebel XTI, so make sure you get one that will fit your camera. 
Celestron 93625 Universal 1.25-inch Camera T-Adapter
This is also required to be able to attach your camera to your telescope. This is universal, as long as you have a t-mount that fits it. I also have the Celestron T Adapter/Barlow which was used to take this picture, as well as this one.

This is what my camera looks like when it’s attached to the telescope. As you can probably imagine, it’s a bit of a pain in the ass when you have to adjust everything to take a picture.
There are also other methods for taking pictures of celestial objects, including using a webcam. I would recommend watching BBC Stargazing Live which is basically a show for beginners like myself. In the future (probably somewhat distant future) when I pick up a far superior telescope, with computerized tracking I will make another post, explaining what will surely be some amazing photos. Until then, these are the basics. 
You guys also asked some questions from an earlier post, so I am going to try and answer some of those now.
davidmerrique asked: Do you just hold your iPhone up to your telescope or do you have some kind of adapter?
I did use my iphone for some earlier pics. It will work somewhat through the viewfinder, but it’s super difficult and not always a great result. 
yesigamenfashion asked: Do you live in an area with a clear veiw.? If not have you taken your telescope out to a rural area to see the sky more clearly?
I live in a horribly light polluted part of Los Angeles. I’ve used the telescope in rural areas and it is noticeably better, but for looking at things like Saturn, or the moon, it makes relatively no difference. It’s things like galaxies, nebulae and star-clusters that become difficult to see in light polluted areas.
abi-31 asked: Which is the best telescope to buy? I know that’s a bit broad, sorry.
Ha, it’s a bit broad. I think for beginners, that Dobsonian I posted above is probably the best. It really just depends on your budget though. There are super duper expensive telescopes you can buy today, that astronomers 100 years ago would have died for. Down the road I plan on laying down the cash for something like this.
j5k asked: I’d like to know the cost of your set up. I’d also like to know how it feels to see a planet for the first time with your own eyes. Thanks.
My telescope was $250 ($200 now) and the camera attachments were about $50 together. I also bought some lenses and such which can add up, but to get started, its about $250-300 and up assuming you already have a camera for pics. I’ll be honest, looking at something like Venus really isn’t that stunning. It’s beautiful and shiny but it’s essentially indistinguishable from a star in a lot of ways. However, looking at something like Saturn with your own eyes is entirely unforgettable. My mom was visiting recently and she doesn’t give a lick about space, but when I showed her Saturn she very loudly exclaimed, and made me readjust my telescope several times (the earth moves fast, so it quickly goes out of view) so she could keep looking at it. I think a lot of people don’t really feel like space is real, and when you see something with your own eyes, it is very much life changing. 
If you have any more questions, please leave them in the comments and I will do my best to answer them. View high resolution

    I’ve been getting a lot of questions lately about my space photography, so I thought I would explain in as much detail how I take them, as well as other information for getting into amateur astronomy. 

    Before I get started though I want to just say to anyone out there who isn’t even remotely interested in space, give it a chance. For some reason the majority of my life I looked at space as something artificial, boring and in a way two dimensional. Then one night I was looking at the moon and realized that it was a tangible object, and there was nothing separating me, from it. From that moment on it had my attention, and now I realize that it is by far the most fascinating and mysterious thing that is available to me. I think we owe it to ourselves and to future generations to get excited about it, and to start a new dialogue pushing for more funding/research/exploration. If you want to learn more, I recommend following r/space and r/spaceporn on reddit, two of my favorite subreddits by far.

    Now for the goodies. 

    NightWatch: A Practical Guide to Viewing the Universe

    This book is a must. A lot of the info I’m about to share is ripped right from this book. I wish I would have picked it up before buying my current telescope because it has an entire section devoted to what to buy. It also has tons of info for learning the night sky, which I am still in the process of doing. It’s a strange thing when the night sky begins to look familiar and you can pick out planets and constellations instantly.

    Celestron SkyMaster Giant 15x70 Binoculars

    It’s recommended that you start with binoculars, but I don’t think it’s a huge deal. However, if you are on a limited budget and want to see things like Jupiter and its moons, craters on the moon, (a faint) Andromeda Galaxy, then pick these up. They are a good way to learn the night sky and will help you in your transition to a telescope. I have this particular pair and I still use them to help spot harder to find objects. They will also increase the amount of stars you see by quite a lot. 

    Celestron 21063 AstroMaster 90 AZ Refractor Telescope

    This is my telescope. It is also my first telescope. I love it, but it has some major drawbacks. For objects higher in the sky, the telescope tends to slide, taking the objects out of view, making for some real frustration. It’s huge, but it looks pretty awesome. All in all I’ve seen some really great stuff with this telescope, but I’m not sure I would recommend it.

    Orion SkyQuest XT8 Classic Dobsonian Telescope

    The book I posted above recommends a moderately priced Dobsonian telescope for beginners, and I wish I would have held out for something like this. I don’t have any experience with one, but I have a hard time recommending my own telescope to people because of the frustration it has caused me, so I figured I would share this as well.

    Celestron Omni 2X Barlow Lens

    A lot of purists will tell you to avoid Barlow lenses, or at least not to become dependent on them. I really like mine. It makes finding objects in the sky much more difficult but will allow for greater detail of smaller objects. 

    Here is what I use for taking pictures:

    Opteka T-Mount Adapter

    This is required to attach the T-Adapter to my camera. I use a Canon Rebel XTI, so make sure you get one that will fit your camera. 

    Celestron 93625 Universal 1.25-inch Camera T-Adapter

    This is also required to be able to attach your camera to your telescope. This is universal, as long as you have a t-mount that fits it. I also have the Celestron T Adapter/Barlow which was used to take this picture, as well as this one.

    This is what my camera looks like when it’s attached to the telescope. As you can probably imagine, it’s a bit of a pain in the ass when you have to adjust everything to take a picture.

    There are also other methods for taking pictures of celestial objects, including using a webcam. I would recommend watching BBC Stargazing Live which is basically a show for beginners like myself. In the future (probably somewhat distant future) when I pick up a far superior telescope, with computerized tracking I will make another post, explaining what will surely be some amazing photos. Until then, these are the basics. 

    You guys also asked some questions from an earlier post, so I am going to try and answer some of those now.

    davidmerrique asked: Do you just hold your iPhone up to your telescope or do you have some kind of adapter?

    I did use my iphone for some earlier pics. It will work somewhat through the viewfinder, but it’s super difficult and not always a great result. 

    yesigamenfashion asked: Do you live in an area with a clear veiw.? If not have you taken your telescope out to a rural area to see the sky more clearly?

    I live in a horribly light polluted part of Los Angeles. I’ve used the telescope in rural areas and it is noticeably better, but for looking at things like Saturn, or the moon, it makes relatively no difference. It’s things like galaxies, nebulae and star-clusters that become difficult to see in light polluted areas.

    abi-31 asked: Which is the best telescope to buy? I know that’s a bit broad, sorry.

    Ha, it’s a bit broad. I think for beginners, that Dobsonian I posted above is probably the best. It really just depends on your budget though. There are super duper expensive telescopes you can buy today, that astronomers 100 years ago would have died for. Down the road I plan on laying down the cash for something like this.

    j5k asked: I’d like to know the cost of your set up. I’d also like to know how it feels to see a planet for the first time with your own eyes. Thanks.

    My telescope was $250 ($200 now) and the camera attachments were about $50 together. I also bought some lenses and such which can add up, but to get started, its about $250-300 and up assuming you already have a camera for pics. I’ll be honest, looking at something like Venus really isn’t that stunning. It’s beautiful and shiny but it’s essentially indistinguishable from a star in a lot of ways. However, looking at something like Saturn with your own eyes is entirely unforgettable. My mom was visiting recently and she doesn’t give a lick about space, but when I showed her Saturn she very loudly exclaimed, and made me readjust my telescope several times (the earth moves fast, so it quickly goes out of view) so she could keep looking at it. I think a lot of people don’t really feel like space is real, and when you see something with your own eyes, it is very much life changing. 

    If you have any more questions, please leave them in the comments and I will do my best to answer them.

  • February 28, 2012 4:15 pm
    Today’s moon.  View high resolution

    Today’s moon. 

  • December 10, 2011 5:01 am
    
There is a full lunar eclipse starting right now, but only visible for those of us on the west coast (outside of North America, Asia and Australia are said to have the best view). The best part (total eclipse) will start at around 6:06 and last til about 6:57 AM PST. 
There won’t be another full eclipse until 2014, so sneak a peak if you’re up and able. 
View high resolution

    There is a full lunar eclipse starting right now, but only visible for those of us on the west coast (outside of North America, Asia and Australia are said to have the best view). The best part (total eclipse) will start at around 6:06 and last til about 6:57 AM PST. 

    There won’t be another full eclipse until 2014, so sneak a peak if you’re up and able. 

  • September 20, 2011 2:57 pm
  • August 31, 2011 11:36 am
    sirmitchell:

Super Sale Week #6: Charlie
 
Only $28! (44% off!!) 
This print will only be available for another week and then it will be gone from Sirmitchell.com forever. 

One day left! 

    sirmitchell:

    Super Sale Week #6: Charlie

    Only $28! (44% off!!) 

    This print will only be available for another week and then it will be gone from Sirmitchell.com forever. 

    One day left!